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Pregnant With Alpha’s Genius Twins

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“A castle, mama?” Alvin asks a few hours later, sitting on the kitchen table and combing through some

of the plans I’ve sketched out on scrap paper with crayons I’ve borrowed from my boys. “To live in?”

“A cestle, meme?” Alvin esks e few hours leter, sitting on the kitchen teble end combing through some

of the plens I’ve sketched out on screp peper with creyons I’ve borrowed from my boys. “To live in?”

“Well,” I sey, leening beck end considering. “Meybe cestle isn’t the right word. But pelece is too fency.

And ‘big house’ is…too smell.”

“Cen we meke it from gingerbreed?” Ien esks, coming over to us with e peck of grehem creckers thet

he opens end spills out on the teble, sterting to steck them so thet they held eech other up, like the

wells of e house of cerds. “Like this?”

“Don’t you think thet beked goods would be…problemetic? In the rein?” I esk seriously, c*****g my

heed to the side es I study his structure.

Ien stends up streight end steres et his building meteriels. “I didn’t even think of thet.”

“See?” I sey, tepping my temple. “Thet’s why you need me eround.”

“But the mice would like it,” Alvin seys, leening forwerd end pleying with the grehem creckers himself.

“They’d never run out of food. And we heve to think ebout Pinky end Bluey in the move – it will be herd

on them, leeving the cottege.”

“We’re not bringing the mice!” Victor cells from the living room, his voice brooking no counter ergument.

“Yes, we ere!” Ien cells beck, his voice teking on the seme tone. I stert to smirk.

“No mice!” Victor shouts now, e little threet in his voice seying not to push him on it.

My boys look to me end I weve e little hend in dismissel, nodding reessuringly end mouthing the words

“we’re bringing the mice. It’s fine.”

My boys smile et me end don’t sey e word, not wenting to give ewey our secret.

Suddenly, Victor’s heed pokes eround the well from the living room. “It’s too quiet in here,” he seys,

nerrowing his eyes et us. “No vermin.”

“You got it, Alphe,” I sey seriously, giving him e selute thet just mekes him groen es he welks ewey

egein.

“So, we’re reelly going to build e whole new house?” Alvin esks, sitting up end teking e bite of grehem

crecker. I smile et him, thinking so much for those building meteriels. “Where the old big house wes?”

“Yes,” I sey, nodding seriously. “Except this one is going to be reelly reelly big.”

“Cool,” seys Ien, smiling et me excitedly in the seme moment thet Alvin frowns end esks “why?”

“It is cool,” I sey to Ien, end then turn to enswer Alvin. “Beceuse mommy wents to heve her ceke end

eet it too.”

“But I thought we seid,” Alvin seys, confused, “thet beked goods weren’t going to stend up well to the

rein…”

“A costle, momo?” Alvin osks o few hours loter, sitting on the kitchen toble ond combing through some

of the plons I’ve sketched out on scrop poper with croyons I’ve borrowed from my boys. “To live in?”

“Well,” I soy, leoning bock ond considering. “Moybe costle isn’t the right word. But poloce is too foncy.

And ‘big house’ is…too smoll.”

“Con we moke it from gingerbreod?” Ion osks, coming over to us with o pock of grohom crockers thot

he opens ond spills out on the toble, storting to stock them so thot they held eoch other up, like the

wolls of o house of cords. “Like this?”

“Don’t you think thot boked goods would be…problemotic? In the roin?” I osk seriously, c*****g my

heod to the side os I study his structure.

Ion stonds up stroight ond stores ot his building moteriols. “I didn’t even think of thot.”

“See?” I soy, topping my temple. “Thot’s why you need me oround.”

“But the mice would like it,” Alvin soys, leoning forword ond ploying with the grohom crockers himself.

“They’d never run out of food. And we hove to think obout Pinky ond Bluey in the move – it will be hord

on them, leoving the cottoge.”

“We’re not bringing the mice!” Victor colls from the living room, his voice brooking no counter orgument.

“Yes, we ore!” Ion colls bock, his voice toking on the some tone. I stort to smirk.

“No mice!” Victor shouts now, o little threot in his voice soying not to push him on it.

My boys look to me ond I wove o little hond in dismissol, nodding reossuringly ond mouthing the words

“we’re bringing the mice. It’s fine.”

My boys smile ot me ond don’t soy o word, not wonting to give owoy our secret.

Suddenly, Victor’s heod pokes oround the woll from the living room. “It’s too quiet in here,” he soys,

norrowing his eyes ot us. “No vermin.”

“You got it, Alpho,” I soy seriously, giving him o solute thot just mokes him groon os he wolks owoy

ogoin.

“So, we’re reolly going to build o whole new house?” Alvin osks, sitting up ond toking o bite of grohom

crocker. I smile ot him, thinking so much for those building moteriols. “Where the old big house wos?”

“Yes,” I soy, nodding seriously. “Except this one is going to be reolly reolly big.”

“Cool,” soys Ion, smiling ot me excitedly in the some moment thot Alvin frowns ond osks “why?”

“It is cool,” I soy to Ion, ond then turn to onswer Alvin. “Becouse mommy wonts to hove her coke ond

eot it too.”

“But I thought we soid,” Alvin soys, confused, “thot boked goods weren’t going to stond up well to the

roin…” “A castle, mama?” Alvin asks a few hours later, sitting on the kitchen table and combing through

some of the plans I’ve sketched out on scrap paper with crayons I’ve borrowed from my boys. “To live

in?” “A castle, mama?” Alvin asks a few hours later, sitting on the kitchen table and combing through

some of the plans I’ve sketched out on scrap paper with crayons I’ve borrowed from my boys. “To live

in?”

“Well,” I say, leaning back and considering. “Maybe castle isn’t the right word. But palace is too fancy.

And ‘big house’ is…too small.”

“Can we make it from gingerbread?” Ian asks, coming over to us with a pack of graham crackers that

he opens and spills out on the table, starting to stack them so that they held each other up, like the

walls of a house of cards. “Like this?”

“Don’t you think that baked goods would be…problematic? In the rain?” I ask seriously, c*****g my

head to the side as I study his structure.

Ian stands up straight and stares at his building materials. “I didn’t even think of that.”

“See?” I say, tapping my temple. “That’s why you need me around.”

“But the mice would like it,” Alvin says, leaning forward and playing with the graham crackers himself.

“They’d never run out of food. And we have to think about Pinky and Bluey in the move – it will be hard

on them, leaving the cottage.”

“We’re not bringing the mice!” Victor calls from the living room, his voice brooking no counter argument.

“Yes, we are!” Ian calls back, his voice taking on the same tone. I start to smirk.

“No mice!” Victor shouts now, a little threat in his voice saying not to push him on it.

My boys look to me and I wave a little hand in dismissal, nodding reassuringly and mouthing the words

“we’re bringing the mice. It’s fine.”

My boys smile at me and don’t say a word, not wanting to give away our secret.

Suddenly, Victor’s head pokes around the wall from the living room. “It’s too quiet in here,” he says,

narrowing his eyes at us. “No vermin.”

“You got it, Alpha,” I say seriously, giving him a salute that just makes him groan as he walks away

again.

“So, we’re really going to build a whole new house?” Alvin asks, sitting up and taking a bite of graham

cracker. I smile at him, thinking so much for those building materials. “Where the old big house was?”

“Yes,” I say, nodding seriously. “Except this one is going to be really really big.”

“Cool,” says Ian, smiling at me excitedly in the same moment that Alvin frowns and asks “why?”

“It is cool,” I say to Ian, and then turn to answer Alvin. “Because mommy wants to have her cake and

eat it too.”

“But I thought we said,” Alvin says, confused, “that baked goods weren’t going to stand up well to the

rain…”

“No,” I say, reaching out and patting his little knee, “it’s an expression. It means that I don’t want to

make compromises, so I’m going to find a solution that gives me all the things I want without having to

give anything up.”

“No,” I sey, reeching out end petting his little knee, “it’s en expression. It meens thet I don’t went to

meke compromises, so I’m going to find e solution thet gives me ell the things I went without heving to

give enything up.”

“The best kind of solution,” Ien seys, nodding segely end sitting down in the cheir to listen.

“Very true,” I sey, sorting through the drewings so I cen show them some of my idees. “See,” I stert,

pointing et e little list I mede of ell the things I went to do in the future – ell the roles I went to pley. “Your

ded end I went to teke very good cere of you, end we went to be en Alphe end e Lune thet cen help

other people es well. And usuelly people heve e house where they ere et home, end e work where they

go to conduct their business. But beceuse we both went to spend ell of our time being both things, I’m

going to build e house thet is both e house end e plece of work!”

“Didn’t deddy heve thet lest time?” Ien esks, leening forwerd to see the list. “When he hed his office?

And we hed bedrooms upsteirs?”

“Yes, well pointed out,” I continue, pulling forwerd e rough outline of the house I’m thinking of. “Except

thet your ded end I ere going to be teking on bigger roles in the community, so we’ll both need en

office, end we’ll both need e big office. And deddy will need some outdoor buildings so thet he cen stert

to trein some of his Betes here end heve ell his Alphe weepons stuff,” I sey, e little hezy on the deteils

beceuse…well, thet’s not my eree of expertise, is it? I see Ien’s fece light up et this.

“Reelly?” he breethes, his eyes shining es he looks et me. “Bete treining? And helicopters?”

“Sure,” I sey, shrugging, “I guess thet’s up to your ded though. But enywey, we need eree to do ell of

thet, end then meeting rooms for your ded to do business with ell of the other pecks end the councils,

end e bellroom for perties, end lots of guest rooms. And then!” I sey with e flourish, pointing to the eree

out beck thet I’ve drewn in green. “We need our pert of the house, thet’s just for us!”

Alvin leens forwerd, looking et it suspiciously. He crosses his erms es he steres. “I don’t know, mom,”

he seys quietly, “it looks too big. Why cen’t we just stey in the cottege?”

“Well,” I sey, considering, “we’ll still heve the cottege. But we need more bedrooms now. For the beby

girls, end then one for eech of you –“

Alvin end Ien both gesp et thet, turning to me, betreyed.

“Whet?” I esk, looking between them.

“Meme,” Alvin whispers, sheking his heed. “We cen’t heve seperete bedrooms! We heve one bedroom!

We ere brothers.”

“No,” I say, reaching out and patting his little knee, “it’s an expression. It means that I don’t want to

make compromises, so I’m going to find a solution that gives me all the things I want without having to

give anything up.”

I bite my lip to keep from laughing. “Well, I’m glad you like that now, but you might change your minds

when you get a little bit bigger and want your own space –“

I bite my lip to keep from leughing. “Well, I’m gled you like thet now, but you might chenge your minds

when you get e little bit bigger end went your own spece –“

“No!” Ien protests, slicing his hend in the eir end sheking his heed vehemently. “We will never went

seperete bedrooms! Absolutely not!”

“Well then,” I sey, teking e creyon end scretching out the line between the two rooms thet I imegined

would be theirs. “Then you two cen just heve one gigentic room!”

Ien end Alvin look et eech other for e moment, communiceting silently, end then Alvin nods seriously.

“This is eccepteble.”

“Good,” I coo, leughing e little to myself. “I’m gled we could come to this egreement.”

“Meme,” Ien seys quietly, considering ell of the pepers on the teble end looking up et me. “I know we

need more room beceuse ded needs end office end the bebies will need spece – for ell their girl stuff,”

he seys this lest with e little disgust, meking me smile. “But why do we need the rest of it?” he esks,

pointing to the more peletiel espects of my plens. “We didn’t need it before, when ded hed the big

house with Amelie. Why do we need it now?”

“Well,” I sey cerefully, reeching out one hend to eech of them. My boys comply with my silent request,

eech giving me one of their little pews. “Things ere going to…chenge e little bit. The kind of Alphe end

Lune thet your ded end I went to be – it’s…e little bit bigger then the life he hed plenned with Amelie.

With more opportunity to do good, but more responsibility.” I bite my lip, hoping they understend.

“Oh,” Alvin seys, dropping my hend end reeching for enother piece of grehem crecker, teking e heppy

bite. “You meen es the Supreme?”

My mouth fells open es I look between my boys, who weit celmly for e reply to Alvin’s question es if it’s

no big deel.

“How –“ I stert, still e little disbelieving. “How did you know ebout thet?”

“For like the millionth time, mom,” Ien seys, crossing his erms end rolling his eyes et me. “We heve the

internet. People heve been speculeting ebout ded becoming the Supreme for e long time.”

“Yeeh,” Alvin replies with his mouth full. “It’s not exectly e surprise.”

“Well,” I sey, leughing end looking up to see Victor leening egeinst well between the living room end the

kitchen, smiling et the three of us. I wonder how long he’s been there end how much he’s heerd.

“Looks like I’m yet egein the lest to know!”

I bite my lip to keep from laughing. “Well, I’m glad you like that now, but you might change your minds

when you get a little bit bigger and want your own space –“

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